Carbon tax: a sign that oil prices will stay lower for longer

The federal government of Canada plans to impose a national carbon tax on any province that refuses to establish one on their own. They argue that putting a price on carbon will give people and companies an incentive to look for lower emission options to save money.

In reality, Canada is the second largest country in the world, just ahead of the United States and behind Russia However, our population is one-tenth the size of our largest trading partner, the United States and one-quarter the size of Russia. I estimate that 75% of Canadians live in rural areas where driving is a necessity and switching to electric heating or electric cars is way too expensive.

At the Golden Globe Awards, Meryl Streep called Canadian actors nice. I would like to add that we, as a nation, are dumb when it comes to energy. Refineries in Eastern Canada are spending billions to purchase about 700,000 barrels a day of foreign oil to meet customer needs while 3 million barrels of Western Canadian oil is sold to the United States at a discount due to lack of pipeline capacity between producing fields in Western Canada and refineries in the East.

Our governments rely on tax revenues from the oil and gas industry which are down with the price of oil. In truth, this carbon tax has nothing to do with lowering emissions but just another tax grab. This is a clear sign that the government believes a rebound in the price of oil is many years away.

The Canadian economy is fragile and the last thing it needs is yet another tax. The potential costs for the average Canadian family by 2022 is up to $2,569 per year. The carbon tax will also increase the price of food and clothing. It will mean lost jobs and make Canadian businesses less competitive.

Lack of pipelines makes me bearish on the Canadian oil patch

  1. It will take years to build the Keystone XL pipeline even if approved by Trump. Plus there will be a massive backlash, both on the ground and in the courts that could tie this project up for many more years.
  2. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gave the green light to Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion but I expect protestors will also delay this project.
  3. The Line 3 Replacement Program was also approved and is the largest project in Enbridge’s history. The anticipated in-service date for this project is 2019, pending U.S. regulatory approvals.

Additional reasons to be bearish on Canadian oil stocks

  1. Most Canadian oil companies are still losing money
  2. The profitable ones have very high price to earnings ratios (CNQ – EPS for 2017 is $1.04 or 39 times earnings and SU is 27 times earnings for 2017)
  3. Shipping oil by rail is way more expensive than by pipeline
  4. The biggest risk to the Canadian oil patch is Trump! He could put a 20% border tax on imported oil.

Foreign oil stocks that I own for yield

I bought some Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) for it’s 6.8% yield in my wife’s retirement account. The dividend is exempt from U.S. withholding tax because it is in a retirement account. Converting the U.S. dividend to Canadian dollars gives me a current yield of 6.8% times 1.32 or 8.98% which is much higher than owning bonds. Plus I can sell covered call options that could boost my returns by 5% or to protect against a fall in oil prices.

I also own Alerian MLP ETF (AMPL) which is a energy partners ETF with a 8% U.S. dollar yield. It has a 10.5% yield in Canadian dollars but does has a high management fee of 0.85%, still better than owning bonds. There are higher yielding limited partnerships but they carry more risk than owning an ETF.

U.S. Shale producers are on my watch list

The majority of these producers are still losing money. At the top of my watch list is Marathon oil (MRO) which is currently trading at $17. 45 but has a book value of $27.40. Their losses have been decreasing and the earnings estimates for a fourth quarter is for a loss of 15 cents a share. I am waiting for Marathon to release their results on Feb 15 to confirm that they are lessening their losses and that their revenue is increasing before I invest.

What oil stocks do you own and why?

Disclaimer: Please do your own research or consult with a qualified financial advisor.

 

 

 

 

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