Risk Tolerance Questionnaire

Take a piece of paper and write down the letter that best describes you for each question. Remember that risk tolerance is largely subjective, so there is no right or wrong answer.

Life Stage

  1. What is your current age? 
    a) 65 or older.
    b) 60 to 64.
    c) 55 to 59.
    d) 50 to 54.
    e) Under 50.
  2. When do you expect to need to withdraw cash from your investment portfolio? 
    a) In less than 1 year.
    b) Within 1 to 2 years.
    c) Within 2 to 5 years.
    d) Within 5 to 10 years.
    e)Not for at least 10 years


Financial Resources

  1. How many months of current living expenses could you cover with your present savings and liquid, short-term investments, before you would have to draw on your investment portfolio? 
    a) Less than 3 months.
    b) 3 to 6 months.
    c) 6 to 12 months.
    d) More than 12 months.
  2. Over the next few years, what do you expect will happen to your income? 
    a) It will probably decrease substantially.
    b) It will probably decrease slightly.
    c) It will probably stay the same.
    d) It will probably increase slightly.
    e) It will probably increase substantially.
  3. What percentage of your gross annual income have you been able to save in recent years? 
    a) None.
    b) 1 to 5%.
    c) 5 to 10%
    d) 10 to 15%
    e) more than 15%
  4. Over the next few years, what do you expect will happen to your rate of savings? 
    a) It will probably decrease substantially.
    b) It will probably decrease slightly.
    c) It will probably stay the same.
    d) It will probably increase slightly.
    e) It will probably increase substantially.


Emotional Risk Tolerance

  1. What are your return expectations for your portfolio? 
    a) I don’t care if my portfolio keeps pace with inflation; I just want to preserve my capital.
    b) My return should keep pace with inflation, with minimum volatility.
    c) My return should be slightly more than inflation, with only moderate volatility.
    d) My return should significantly exceed inflation, even if this could mean significant volatility.
  2. How would you characterize your personality? 
    a) I’m a pessimist. I always expect the worst.
    b) I’m anxious. No matter what you say, I’ll worry.
    c) I’m cautious but open to new ideas. Convince me.
    d) I’m objective. Show me the pros and cons and I can make a decision and live with it.
    e) I’m optimistic. Things always work out in the end.
  3. When monitoring your investments over time, what do you think you will tend to focus on? 
    a) Individual investments that are doing poorly.
    b) Individual investments that are doing very well.
    c) The recent results of my overall portfolio.
    d) The long term performance of my overall portfolio.
  4. Suppose you had $10,000 to invest and the choice of 5 different portfolios with a range of possible outcomes after a single year. Which of the following portfolios would you feel most comfortable investing in? 
    a) Portfolio A, which could have a balance ranging from $9,900 to $10,300 at the end of the year.
    b) Portfolio B, which could have a balance ranging from $9,800 to $10,600 at the end of the year.
    c) Portfolio C, which could have a balance ranging from $9,600 to $11,000 at the end of the year.
    d) Portfolio D, which could have a balance ranging from $9,200 to $12,200 at the end of the year.
    e) Portfolio E, which could have a balance ranging from $8,400 to $14,000 at the end of the year.
  5. If the value of your investment portfolio dropped by 20% in one year, what would you do? 
    a) Fire my investment advisor.
    b) Move my money to more conservative investments immediately to reduce the potential for future losses.
    c) Monitor the situation, and if it looks like things could continue to deteriorate, move some of my money to more conservative investments.
    d) Consult with my investment advisor to ensure that my asset allocation is correct, and then ride it out.
    e) Consider investing more because prices are so low.
  6. Which of the following risks or events do you fear most? 
    a) A loss of principal over any period of 1 year or less.
    b) A rate of inflation that exceeds my rate of return over the long term, because it will erode the purchasing power of my money.
    c) Portfolio performance that is insufficient to meet my goals.
    d) Portfolio performance that is consistently less than industry benchmarks.
    e) A missed investment opportunity that could have yielded higher returns over the long term, even though it entailed higher risk.

Scoring

Give the following points for each answer: a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, e = 5

Interpretation of Results

If your Life Stage Score is: If your Life Stage Score is: Then your Investment Time Horizon is:
1 to 3 Short-term (5 years or less)
4 to 6 Intermediate-term (5 to 10 years)
7 to 10 Long-term (over 10 years)
If your Investment Style Score is: Then Your Investment Style is:
5 to 10 Very conservative
11 to 20 Moderately conservative
21 to 30 Moderate
31 to 40 Moderately Aggressive
41 to 50 Very aggressive

 

The Amazon effect could still benefit the following companies

The “Amazon effect” is the ongoing evolution and disruption of the retail market, resulting in increased e-commerce. The major manifestation of the Amazon effect is the ongoing consumer shift to shopping online.

You don’t have to be a financial analyst to realize that card credit usage has gone up. Most brick and mortar retail establishments allow the consumer the choice of paying with cash, debit or credit card. Almost 90 % of all purchases that happen on line are with credit cards. Credit card companies are a popular choice because they will reverse any fraudulent purchases plus some offer extended warranties and all of them have reward programs.

The three most popular credit card cards world-wide are Visa (V), MasterCard (MC) and American Express (AXP). The chart below compares all three to Amazon over a five year period. It appears that investors think that Visa will benefit the most from the “Amazon effect”.

Keep in mind that Amazon has a rewards Visa card which earns users a rebate on all their purchases. Cardholders get 3% back for purchases made at Amazon.com, 2% cash back at gas stations, restaurants and drugstores, and 1% back on all other purchases which earns users a rebate on all their purchases.

Despite news that Amazon is buying trucks and planes to better service their prime customers, delivery companies FedEx and UPS will still benefit from the “Amazon Effect.” The chart below compares these two companies to Amazon over a five year period. FedEx is by far the clear winner for investors.

While there is a glut of malls in America, there aren’t nearly enough warehouses across the U.S. to support internet retailers like Amazon. Retail sales are not in decline, but rather shifting toward e-commerce so all retailers will require large amounts of warehouse space.”

When retailers reconfigure their supply chain to accommodate the shift in consumer behavior, the requirement for warehousing space will increase substantially. This is true incremental demand and not a displacement of existing demand for warehouse square footage. Companies like Wal-Mart, Alibaba and Wayfair will also have to invest in new warehouses to try to compete with Amazon over the next few years.

Industrial REITs such as Rexford Industrial (REXR), Terreno (TRNO) and Stag Industrial (STAG) are at the top of most buy lists. Other industrial REITs that you should consider include First Industrial (FR) and Monmouth (MNR). 

Amazon’s deal for Whole Foods will likely spur a “last mile” investment by the internet giant and its competitors, Jefferies’ Petersen has predicted. “Last mile” is a reference to the warehouse that is closest to a store, a crucial point of the distribution chain that makes same-day delivery possible.

“By analyzing all of Amazon’s ‘last mile’ facilities by size and population demographics against the Industrial REIT portfolios, we found that REXR and TRNO are best positioned to serve the ‘last mile,'” Petersen said.

Then, Amazon investing in so-called secondary and tertiary markets will benefit a REIT like STAG, he added.

One of the biggest risks in owning REITs is rising interest rates. Higher borrowing costs can reduce cash flow and effect their ability to pay dividends. It also makes the financing of new projects less profitable.

A lot of the “Amazon effect” is already priced in to all of these stocks but the long term upward trend is still there.