Trump criticized the Federal Reserve’s interest-rate increases, it’s the economy, stupid

President Trump blasts the Federal Reserve’s interest-rate increases last week, breaking with more than two decades of White House tradition of avoiding comments on monetary policy out of respect for the independence of the U.S. central bank.

The Fed has raised interest rates five times since Trump took office in January 2017, with two of those coming this year under Chairman Jerome Powell, the president’s pick to replace Janet Yellen.

“I am not happy about it. But at the same time I’m letting them do what they feel is best,” Trump said. In the interview, Trump called Powell a “very good man.”

Since 1977, the Federal Reserve has operated under a mandate from Congress to “promote effectively the goals of maximum employment, stable prices, and moderate long term interest rates”, what is now commonly referred to as the Fed’s “dual mandate.”

The GOP’s tax cuts put the petal to the metal in an already accelerating U.S. economy. The unemployment rate which was heading lower got some extra juice. A 4 percent unemployment rate is very close to the Fed’s goal of maximum employment. However, wage inflation hasn’t show up yet as corporations are increasing dividends and buying back shares instead of increasing employee wages. (So much for trickle-down economics)

The real threat to the U.S. economy is inflation which has started to rear its ugly head due to a rebound in oil prices. The Fed is concern that the Trump administration’s use of tariffs to get better trading deals from all its trading partners will eventually lead to higher inflation. The Federal Reserve can let inflation run a little hotter temporally but it may be forced to accelerate interest rate increases.

Powell addressed Congress last week and told lawmakers that “for now — the best way forward is to keep gradually raising the federal funds rate.” Fed officials have penciled in two more hikes this year. That is one more rate hike then when Yellen was heading the Fed.

The probability that investors assigned to a Fed rate hike in September was little changed near 90 percent after the president’s remarks, while the probability of a December hike was also holding near 65 percent, according to trading in federal funds futures.

Will tariffs clause more inflation and or job loses?

The impact of tariffs takes time to make its way through the economy. Corporations will try to pass on higher input costs to their customers. Higher prices could lead to a decease in sales, causing corporations to cut costs by reducing their work force.

In my humble opinion, it all depends on the amount of the tariff. A 10 percent tariff will add to inflation but a 25 percent tariff will clause job loses.

Case in point, American farmers are feeling the pain of increase tariffs levied by U.S.  trading partners.

Trade conflicts “are having a real and costly impact on the rural economy and the ability of rural businesses to keep their doors open,” said Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin, a Democrat, asking Trump to develop a farm plan. “Without prompt action, we could lose farmers and the rural businesses they support and depend on at an even more rapid rate.”

The Trump administration announced that it will deliver US$12 billion in aid to farmers who’ve been hit by dropping prices for crops and livestock amid a burgeoning trade war in which agriculture is a main target for retaliation against U.S. tariffs.

I am confused, Trump wants U.S. trading partners to eliminate all tariffs and subsidies. Yet, he is threatening more tariffs and providing more subsidies.

 

 

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Option traders are benefiting from trade war fears

Last year was among the least volatile in the history of the stock market. The VIX which measures market volatility averaged a little over 11 for 2017. It was the lowest level for the index since it was introduced in 1986.

Fear is back in the markets as talk of tariffs dominate the financial news media. Choppy markets increase option premiums so it is a good time to write options. The reward for giving someone else the option to buy or sell something has gone way up this year.

Option-writing strategies range from conservative (covered calls and collars) to extremely risky (naked puts). With the virtually unlimited variations of strike prices and expiration dates available, investors can customize their risk/reward parameters with remarkable precision.

Here are three common option strategies that can generate income or limit losses from an investment portfolio.

1. Covered calls and collars

The most common, conservative way to take advantage of rich option premiums is to write call options on securities you already own. If you’re invested in stock funds, you can write on stock indexes although the premiums are generally less than on individual stocks.

For example, say you own 100 shares of Apple at $190.00 and you wanted to generate some income.  Selling a call option expiring on Aug. 17 to buy 100 shares of Apple at the strike price of $195 provides $3.40 of income. That amounts to a 1.7 percent return on a monthly basis, roughly 20 percent annually, assuming you can repeat the process for 12 months.

The risk in the strategy is that the stock rises significantly and your shares are called away at the strike price. In other words, you limit your potential upside from owning the stock in return for the premium income you receive. The option premium also provides a small cushion against losses, but if the stock or index falls dramatically, so will the value of your holdings.

If investors want downside protection, they can buy puts on the position simultaneously. A collar, often called a costless collar, is a strategy that uses the premiums from writing call options to purchase out of the money puts that limit the downside risk on an investment. In the Apple example, you would sell one $195 call option for $ 3.40 and use the money to  buy one Aug 17 put at 185.00 for $3.30

Two things to keep in mind:

  1. The longer the term on a call option, the more premium you’ll receive, but the greater the risk that your investment is called away.
  2. Single stock options pay better premiums than those on an index such as the S&P 500. They are also riskier and more volatile.

2. Straddles are for speculating on short-term price movements

Option straddles are not writing strategies that generate premium income, but rather pure plays on volatility.If an investor believes that a stock or index is going to have a big move either up or down, a straddle can help them benefit from it while limiting the potential risk. The strategy involves buying a put and call option with the same strike price and maturity on a single security or index.

The chart below is the three month price movements of the Dow Jones index which has been very sensitive to fears of a trade war.

For this example I will use the  Dow Jones index (DIA) which closed at 249.30 today so you could buy one Aug 17 $250 call option for $3.10 and one Aug 17 $250 put option for $4.15

Option traders hope that one of the options expires worthless and the other results in a windfall. The worst-case scenario is that the underlying index doesn’t move at all and both options expire worthless. You lose your entire investment in that scenario. The break-even point is when the value of one of the options equals the cost of buying the two contracts. We could get lucky and sell the call option if the Dow suddenly moves up in a short period of time and sell the put option if the Dow moves back down just as fast.

3. Writing cash secured put options or writing put spreads

Financial advisors agree that writing put options when you don’t have the cash to fulfill the contract, is a recipe for disaster. That doesn’t mean you have to avoid writing put option contracts. But you do need to have the cash to buy the shares if the market falls and the option is executed by the buyer. The advantage of writing puts is that they generally carry higher premiums than call options do.

For example, you may like Apple stock but are worried that it’s overvalued at $190. If you write a put option with a strike price of $180, you get the premium income and the opportunity to buy the stock at a lower price.

A put spread is used when you don’t have the cash to buy the underlying stock if it falls. For example, you may not have the money to buy 100 shares of Apple but you think the stock price is stuck in a trading range around $180 to $190. You could sell the Aug 17 $180 put option for $1.95 and buy the Aug 17 $170 put option for $0.70 and net $1.25 if both option expire worthless. The caveat is that if Apple tanks, your potential loss on the contract is limited since you bought put protection at the $170 strike price.

Options are powerful tools that carry embedded leverage and are riskier than owning the underlying security. Premiums are richer now because volatility is higher. Buy a call option and it could become worthless overnight after a bad earning release. Sell a naked put and your potential losses can be catastrophic. Most financial advisors suggest that buying or selling options should be left to experts.

I believe that an investor with a good understand of simple mathematics and the willingness to learn can use options to protect their portfolios and earn some extra income.

Disclaimer: The option trades listed in this post are for educational purposes only and recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry America, Canada is imposing retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods

We have been good neighbours for 151 years and we share the longest unsecured international border in the whole world.  We have fought and died together in too many wars to even count. However, Canada’s foreign minister announced Friday that Ottawa plans to impose about $12.6 billion worth of retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods on July 1, joining other major U.S. allies striking back in the escalating trade dispute.

Canada’s plan taking effect next week will include imports of U.S. products such as yogurt, caffeinated roasted coffee, toilet paper and sleeping bags. Canada’s announcement is part of larger fallout from U.S. President Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imposed on Canada, the EU and other nations. As a result, some of the U.S.’ biggest trading partners have retaliated with counter-tariffs.

 “We will not escalate, and we will not back down,” Freeland said.

Mexico’s tariffs took effect June 5 on U.S. products such as pork, cheese, cranberries, whiskey and apples. The EU enacted tariffs Friday on more than $3 billion worth of U.S. goods including bourbon, yachts and motorcycles.

The White House’s stated goal in implementing tariffs is protecting U.S. jobs, but the initial business response suggests that U.S. companies are taking a hit. Companies are coping with the tit-for-tat tariffs by increasing prices or making business changes to cope with higher costs.

Harley-Davidson, an American Icon, is an example why Trumps’s protectionist agenda may not work.

In May 2017, Harley said it planned to build a plant in Thailand. Harley’s CEO, Matt Levatich, said the decision was made as part of a “Plan B” when Trump dropped out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The plant would allow Harley to avoid Thailand’s tariffs on imported motorcycles and help the company obtain tax breaks when exporting to neighbouring countries.

In January Harley announced plans to close its Kansas City plant, leaving 800 workers without jobs. It will shift operations to another plant in York, Pennsylvania, and hire some workers there, but ultimately there will be a net loss of 350 jobs. Days later it said it would spend nearly $700 million on stock buybacks that would benefit shareholders.

The company also announced on Monday it will shift the production of its Europe-bound motorcycles overseas as a result of the EU’s retaliatory tariffs. It’s not exactly clear which factories will take on the excess production for Harley. However, Harley’s Street-model bikes are made in India for Italy, Spain, and Portugal. More American jobs could be effected.

Harley-Davidson took its tax cut, closed a plant, and bought back stock.

The chart below is Harley-Davidson’s stock price from Trump being elected President to Friday’s closing prices. Is it safe to assume that both shareholders and workers are not benefiting from Trump’s protectionist agenda?

The automotive industry is Trump’s next target for imposing tariffs. Trump’s Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross plans two days of public hearings on July 19-20 aimed to wrap up the probe into whether imported vehicles represent a national security threat by late July or August.

Two major auto trade groups warned imposing 25 percent tariffs on imported vehicles would cost hundreds of thousands of auto jobs, dramatically hike prices on vehicles and threaten industry spending on self-driving cars.

Lets hope that this trade war with our American neighbours will not accelerate! Wishing them a Happy 4th of July!