A big disconnect between the Stock Market and the Canadian Economy

Canada’s economy is expanding at its fastest annualized rate in six years according to Statistics Canada. That’s a quarterly expansion rate of 4.5% which is the highest figure since the third quarter of 2011. It was led by the biggest binge in household spending since before the 2008-2009 global recession.

Economists had predicted Canada to grow around 3.7% and the Bank of Canada latest forecast was for GDP to expand at 3% in their July press release. When combined with the 3.7% expansion of the first quarter, it’s the strongest six month start in 15 years.

Why isn’t money pouring into the Toronto Stock Market?

Often times the equity market is moving well before the economy does and of course the Canadian equity market had a robust year in 2016. Investors may already have priced in all the good news last year, when Canada’s stock index gained 18 percent, one of the world’s best performances.

Part of the problem is that Canada’s stock market isn’t totally reflective of the economy, since it’s heavily reliant on energy and financials. Those two sectors account for 54 percent of the S&P/TSX Composite Index.

The outlook for oil is very subdued, it is still trading below $50 a barrel even with the shutdown of refineries due to hurricane Harvey. Global inventories continue to stay high and OPEC’s has lost its influence in cutting production. Crude oil prices in the future’s market are still below $50 a barrel for all of 2018 and part of 2019. Foreign investors are taking money out of the Alberta’s oil patch.

Continued growth in residential investments which was up an annualized 16 percent in the first quarter is also likely to fade as the impact of government measures to cool housing markets kick in. Although, bank earnings have beat expectations by a wide margin, loan growth going forward is expected to decline and loan losses are expected to increase. U.S. hedge funds are still shorting Canadian financials expecting the housing bubble to burst.

Investors believe that this robust growth will force the Bank of Canada to continue raising interest rates this year. It could add extra pressure to lowering consumer spending due to high indebtedness of Canadian households. It will also add a cooling effect to the hot housing prices in both the Vancouver and Toronto real estate markets. The rapid rise in the value of the Canadian dollar is added proof that currency traders are betting that a hike in interest rates is coming soon.

Uncertainty over NATFA  renegotiation

Global political developments aren’t helping, with renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement which started in August, created a new spat with the U.S. erupting over aerospace manufacturing.

Already, data suggest investment into the country is cooling. Foreign direct investment in Canada dropped 25 percent to C$8.68 billion in the first quarter, according to separate data released Tuesday. The country relies heavily on foreign funding to finance spending — totaling C$130 billion over the past two years, according to balance of payment data.

Canada has benefited from a convergence of developments that include a coordinated global recovery and rising trade volumes. The bottoming of the oil shock in western Canada, along with federal deficit spending, rising industrial production in developed economies. Canadian consumers have benefited from a buoyant jobs market and rising home values, resulting in a surge in consumer spending.

Is this Sustainable? I think not!

Economists had been predicting a slowdown in growth to about 2 percent in the second half of this year, but are revising numbers up after the GDP report. I believe this surge in economic growth is temporary. The higher value of the Canadian dollar and higher interest rates will dampen economic growth.

The Toronto stock market returns for all of 2017 are flat which could indicate that foreign investors also believe the future going forward isn’t so rosy!

 

 

 

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The Amazon effect could still benefit the following companies

The “Amazon effect” is the ongoing evolution and disruption of the retail market, resulting in increased e-commerce. The major manifestation of the Amazon effect is the ongoing consumer shift to shopping online.

You don’t have to be a financial analyst to realize that card credit usage has gone up. Most brick and mortar retail establishments allow the consumer the choice of paying with cash, debit or credit card. Almost 90 % of all purchases that happen on line are with credit cards. Credit card companies are a popular choice because they will reverse any fraudulent purchases plus some offer extended warranties and all of them have reward programs.

The three most popular credit card cards world-wide are Visa (V), MasterCard (MC) and American Express (AXP). The chart below compares all three to Amazon over a five year period. It appears that investors think that Visa will benefit the most from the “Amazon effect”.

Keep in mind that Amazon has a rewards Visa card which earns users a rebate on all their purchases. Cardholders get 3% back for purchases made at Amazon.com, 2% cash back at gas stations, restaurants and drugstores, and 1% back on all other purchases which earns users a rebate on all their purchases.

Despite news that Amazon is buying trucks and planes to better service their prime customers, delivery companies FedEx and UPS will still benefit from the “Amazon Effect.” The chart below compares these two companies to Amazon over a five year period. FedEx is by far the clear winner for investors.

While there is a glut of malls in America, there aren’t nearly enough warehouses across the U.S. to support internet retailers like Amazon. Retail sales are not in decline, but rather shifting toward e-commerce so all retailers will require large amounts of warehouse space.”

When retailers reconfigure their supply chain to accommodate the shift in consumer behavior, the requirement for warehousing space will increase substantially. This is true incremental demand and not a displacement of existing demand for warehouse square footage. Companies like Wal-Mart, Alibaba and Wayfair will also have to invest in new warehouses to try to compete with Amazon over the next few years.

Industrial REITs such as Rexford Industrial (REXR), Terreno (TRNO) and Stag Industrial (STAG) are at the top of most buy lists. Other industrial REITs that you should consider include First Industrial (FR) and Monmouth (MNR). 

Amazon’s deal for Whole Foods will likely spur a “last mile” investment by the internet giant and its competitors, Jefferies’ Petersen has predicted. “Last mile” is a reference to the warehouse that is closest to a store, a crucial point of the distribution chain that makes same-day delivery possible.

“By analyzing all of Amazon’s ‘last mile’ facilities by size and population demographics against the Industrial REIT portfolios, we found that REXR and TRNO are best positioned to serve the ‘last mile,'” Petersen said.

Then, Amazon investing in so-called secondary and tertiary markets will benefit a REIT like STAG, he added.

One of the biggest risks in owning REITs is rising interest rates. Higher borrowing costs can reduce cash flow and effect their ability to pay dividends. It also makes the financing of new projects less profitable.

A lot of the “Amazon effect” is already priced in to all of these stocks but the long term upward trend is still there.

Tips on rebalancing your retirement portfolio

rebalance-moneyunder30

Many investors are in for a rude awakening when they open their year-end retirement plan statements. The bond portion will probably show negative returns. It could even wipeout a good portion of their positive returns from owning equities.

Now, the most common method used in rebalancing your established asset allocation mix would be to reduce the holdings that are up in value (sell stocks) and buy assets that have fallen in price (buy bonds). This practice may have worked very well in the past but interest rates are going up forcing bond prices down.

The chart below compares the S&P 500 with the IShares 20 plus year Treasury bond ETF

tlt

“The decades-long bull market in U.S. Treasuries has finally drawn to a close following Donald Trump’s surprise presidential election victory, according to mutual-fund manager Bill Miller.”

“Miller isn’t the first to call time on the bond bull market. Economist Henry Kaufman, the original “Dr. Doom” who is credited with calling the last bond bear market in the 1970s, told the Financial Times this week that the current bull run is at an end.”

In the past, when the Federal Reserve decided it was time to unwind its easy monetary policies, it would raise the federal funds rate fairly quickly. The Fed believes a neutral stance on monetary policy is reached somewhere above the 4% level. The current Federal Reserve is moving slower than normal. Based on an average of three rate hikes per year, it will take the Fed a little over 4 years to normalize interest rates.

Tip # 1

Short-term, reduce or eliminate investing in target date mutual funds since they automatically rebalance from equities to bonds. Plus they increase your bond exposure the closer you are to retirement.

Tip # 2

During a period of rising interest rates, the prudent strategy is to reduce the duration of your bond portfolio. That could mean using a short-term bond ETF or a ladder of GICs both of which would allow you to benefit from an increase in rates.

Tip # 3

If you’re comfortable with a little credit risk, use short-term investment-grade corporate bonds to get a little more yield.

Tip # 4

Cash is by far the safest asset class. Move some of your equity allocation and some of your fixed income allocation to cash. I have my doubts that President Elect Trump can get congress to pass all his stimulus agenda and even economists are unsure if these policies will actual increase economic growth.

Corrections in the bond market are not as uncommon as you think. Most have been short in duration. See the chart below:

lt-treas-losses

Keep in mind that in the past, rate hikes were implemented  at a much faster pace than what the current Fed has purposed. Losses in the bond market could continue for longer than expected.