Investing ideas: I liked the product so much, I bought the company

Victor K. Kiam made a fortune as the President and CEO of Remington Products which he famously purchased in 1979 after his wife bought him his first electric shaver. Kiam became famous as the spokesman for the Remington shaver. His catchphrase, “I liked the shaver so much, I bought the company”, it made him a household name.

Your iPhone is your BFF and you can’t function without a Starbucks latte. You post something on your Facebook page every day, go home from work and chill out by watching Netflix. They’re all products you love and know well.

But does that mean the companies behind them are good investments?

The short answer: At least it’s a good starting point.

At first glance, it isn’t a terrible idea to own stocks if you have a good understanding of a company’s products and have a good feeling it will be successful. Yet knowing whether a business makes a good product and has excellent customer service are by no means the only measurements for investing.

For example: Snapchat (SNAP) and Twitter (TWTR) are both very popular but can they become sustainable businesses with positive earnings growth? So far, it isn’t looking very good for either of these companies. Before you invest, you have to determine whether the product or service is just a new fad or a money-making long-term trend.

One of my best investment ideas in 2016 came from going on vacation on a cruise line. Talking to other passengers I got very positive feedback on their cruise line experiences. Plus many of my boomer friends confirmed that they also loved taking a vacation on a cruise line.  The baby boom generation is getting older and I had dinner with many passengers in their eighties and even with one women in her nineties. (This could be a long-term trend)

Although I was on vacation on a Carnival ship, I bought shares in Royal Caribbean after extensive research.

Price / Earnings Earnings growth (5yr) Operating margin
Royal Caribbean 17.7 times 16.45% 19.95%
Carnival 18.5 times 8.95% 16.63%

It turns out that I could have beaten the returns of the S&P 500 index by owning either RCL or CCL as illustrated by the chart below.

Finding good, long-term investments is exceedingly difficult, there are only a few good ideas out there. When you find an extraordinary business and you have an understanding of what its future looks like, you should invest some money into it. Unfortunately, going that takes time, effort and know-how, often more than casual investors will do on their own “but it can be done”.

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My 200th post: Investing in the Second Machine Age

As a retired senior, I am having difficulty adjusting to ” the Second Machine Age”. The advances in technology are mind blowing. I would never have guessed that self-driving cars in science fiction movies like “Minority Report”  or “I Robot” could become available in my life time.  How about Elon Musk’s vision of offering a rocket ride of only 30 minutes to get to London from L.A., is that just science fiction or a potential reality?

China, the world’s biggest vehicle market, is considering a ban on the production and sale of fossil fuel vehicles in order to reduce pollution and boost the production of electric vehicles. The move would follow a similar ban by France and Britain but they have included a 2040 timeline. However, China has introduced draft regulation to compel vehicle manufacturers to produce more electric vehicles by 2020 through a complex quota system.

Some possible investments to consider

  1. Millions of dollars are pouring into the Global X lithium & Battery ETF (LIT). It has had a massive gain in value of 58% so far this year. It has also attracted short sellers who are betting on a pullback in price.
  2. For stock pickers, the top ten holdings of LIT include five U.S. listed companies, ticker symbols Tsla, FMC, SQM, ENS and ALB. A word of caution, some of these stocks have very high valuations and can be very volatile.

There is little doubt in my mind that advances in digital automation, robotics and artificial intelligence will change your living standards over the next decade. Just think how companies like Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Google and Apple have already influence our lives during the past decade.

A 2013 study by Oxford University’s Carl Frey and Michael Osborne estimates that 47 percent of U.S. jobs will potentially be replaced by robots and automated technology in the next 10 to 20 years. Those individuals working in transportation, logistics, office management and production are likely to be the first to lose their jobs to robots, according to the report.

Some possible investments to consider to capitalize on this trend

  1. Robotics and Automation ETF (ROBO) which contains three U.S. listed companies in their top ten holdings. Ticker symbols, AVAV, HOLI and CGNX
  2. Global X Robotics & Artificial Intelligence ETF (BOTZ) which contains three U.S. listed companies in their top ten holdings. Ticker symbols: NVDA, ISRG and TRMB
  3.  Semiconductor ETFs like SOXX or SMH which include companies that provide key components for self-driving vehicles, automation, robotics and artificial intelligence. The top ten holdings of these ETFs are places to look for individual names that could outperform the overall market.

There is also an interesting book that I am thinking about buying.

Synopsis: According to the authors, the book has three sections.

  • Chapters 1 through 6 describe “the fundamental characteristics of the second machine age,” based on many examples of modern use of technology.
  • Chapters 7 through 11 describe economic impacts of technology in terms of two concepts the authors call “bounty” and “spread.” What the authors call “bounty” is their attempt to measure the benefits of new technology in ways reaching beyond such measures as GDP, which they say is inadequate. They use “spread” as a shorthand way to describe the increasing inequality that is also resulting from widespread new technology.
  • Chapters 12 through 15, the authors prescribe some policy interventions that could enhance the benefits and reduce the harm of new technologies.

You can also search you-tube “The second machine age” to listen to the authors speak. 

 

Disclaimer: Do your own research, these investment ideas can be very volatile. 

Upcoming blockbusters could boost movie chain stocks

I have to admit that one of my guilty pleasures is watching movies on a big movie screen. My wife and I really enjoy science fiction and superhero type movies. We see anywhere from 10 to 15 movies every year. Sometimes we will even see the same movie more than once.

2017 has been a rough year for the film industry, with the North American box office suffering its lowest-grossing summer in 25 years. Ticket sales are down 10.8 percent this summer and have decreased by nearly 3 percent year to date. Box office flops such as “The Mummy” and “Baywatch” have hurt Hollywood but there will be some upcoming movies this year that could turn into blockbusters.

Release dates in November and December of 2017 include Thor: Ragnarok, Justice League and my personal favorite Star Wars: The Last Jedi.  Upcoming movies in 2018 appears to be very strong with:

  • Black Panther
  • X-Men: The New Mutants
  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Han Solo,
  • Deadpool 2 
  • Ant-man & The Wasp.

However, investors have really punished the movie chain stocks. U.S. chains, Regal Entertainment (RGC) and Cinemark (CNK) are down 35% & 25% respectfully over the past 6 months. Cineplex (CGX) the largest Canadian chain is also down 25%, see chart below:

The vast majority of theaters in the U.S. keep a larger percentage of the ticket sales the longer the film is in the theater. For example: opening weekend they may get 10%, the 4th  week up to 25% and the 10th  week up to 50% or more. While concessions account for only about 20% of gross revenues, they represent about 40% of theaters’ profits. Profit margins on soda and popcorn average 85 percent.

All three of these stocks pay dividends, Regal has the highest yield of 5.7% followed by Cineplex at 4.35% and Cinemark with 3.43%. I expect that their 3rd quarter results could disappoint which would be a good buying opportunity. However, there is a risk that the price of these stocks could move up in anticipation of better future earnings.

Possible ways to trade a rebound in movie chain stocks

  1. Take a half position now and buy the other half after 3rd quarter earnings are released
  2. Buy a full position near the ex-dividend date, to get paid while you wait
  3. Buy half position, sell covered calls and sell cash secured puts for the other half.
  4. Buy some long calls near 4th quarter earnings release scheduled for Feb. 2018

Being an option trader, I am going to wait until Feb 2018 options are available. If the VIX which measures volatility stays low, I will probably buy a call option on one or two of these stocks.

 

Disclaimer: This post is for discussion purposes, do your own research.

Why you should look under the ETF’s hood

A fund’s name might seem like a good starting point for gaining an initial understanding of how it is constructed. Unfortunately, names turn out to offer little help for evaluating funds. There is simply no universally accepted system in use by ETF providers and research to classify funds. For example “Infrastructure” would seem to have something to do with the amenities, roads and power supplies needed to operate society.

Names can be deceiving! To illustrate, I went to one of my favorite ETF provider’s web site to look under the hood. I was looking to find some discrepancies. It took some time but the geographic allocation in the fact sheet on the BMO Global Infrastructure Index ETF (ZGI) wasn’t global at all but had the majority of their holdings in North America.

  • 66.02% United States
  • 25.16% Canada
  • 6.71% United Kingdom
  • 1.56% Mexico
  • 0.56% Brazil

The top ten holdings also have a lot of pipeline companies who pay construction companies to build the actual  infrastructure.

  • Enbridge 10.07%
  • American Tower Corp 8.82%
  • National Grid Plc 6.71%
  • TransCanada Corp 6.68%
  • Crown Castle Intl Corp 6.07%
  • Kinder Morgan 5.87%
  • P G & E Corp 5.17%
  • Sempra Energy 4.25%
  • Williams Cos 96%
  • Edison International 3.82%

It takes years for pipeline companies to benefit from any new capacity to come on line. On the other hand, companies who specialize in construction & engineering like SNC-Lavalin or Aecon would see immediate revenue growth. I would recommend looking for another infrastructure ETF that had more global exposure with holdings of construction & engineering type companies.

Another example is the BMO S&P/TSX Equal Weight Industrials Index ETF (ZIN) which has a small discrepancy. The fact sheet says it has 26 industrial holdings but two of those holdings include airlines. (Air Canada 5.46% & Westjet 4.13%)  Now both of these companies buy industrial products but they specialize in transportation.

Here are some key steps all investors should take when evaluating ETFs:

  1. First, decide if you are going to be a do-it-yourself investor or work with an advisor. As their name suggests, ETFs are traded on exchanges, so they can be bought and sold like stocks through a discount brokerage.
  2. Make sure you understand the index underlying the ETF you are considering. Focus on how the index is constructed, what it tracks and how long it has been around. A longer record will reveal how the index responded to different market conditions.
  3. Check the fund’s fact sheet, are the underlying holdings and geographic allocation accurate? How does the exchanged traded fund compare with similar funds from other providers?
  4. Avoid ultra-short and leveraged ETFs, leave those to professional traders.

Ultimately, the proper implementation of ETFs in a portfolio requires, like all investment decisions, due diligence, caution and persistence. ETFs can offer many attractive features but their long-term value depends on how well they fit into an individual’s portfolio.

To evaluate an appropriate fit, investors have to be prepared to look under the hood.

 

 

 

How has the Trump circus effective your investments?

As a Canadian, I think that the Washington circus is no longer funny. It has become “very scary”. We came very close to a nuclear war. Tensions regarding North Korea have lessen temporarily and the market sell off could have been a lot worse. So far, investors have ignored the noise coming out of Washington as U.S. corporate earnings have been better than expected.

Canadian and European investors with holdings in U.S. dollars have seen their investment returns reduced by the falling value of the U.S. dollar. For example, my investment club’s U.S. portfolio is up 10.2% as of the end of July. However, it is up only 2.3% when converted into Canadian dollars. The value of the Euro is also up 10% compared to the U.S. dollar.

The recent rally in gold is another sign of a weakening value of the U.S. dollar. A falling dollar not only increases the value of other currencies, it also increases the demand for commodities like gold. Investors buy gold as a hedge against a further weakening of the U.S. dollar.

American investors with holdings outside of the U.S. have benefited the most from a weaker dollar. Corporations that generate revenue outside the U.S. will get an earnings boost from foreign profits.   Keep in mind that the bond market doesn’t believe the Trump growth agenda will get passed any time soon. The yield on 10 year treasuries has fallen back to pre-election lows. Returns in U.S. bond portfolios have been positive for American investors.

Biggest Market Risks

  1. More inflammatory tweets from Trump regarding North Korea
  2. The resignation of Trump’s key economic advisors, Gary Cohn and Steven Mnuchin
  3. The Fed increasing short term rates causing an inverted yield curve which historically causes a U.S. recession.
  4. In fighting within the Republican Party continues and they are unable to pass meaningful economic fiscal policy.
  5. Trump’s desperation for a win causes him to tear up the NAFTA agreement?

I find this very disturbing:

President Trump’s approval rating is at its lowest since he took office with only 35% of Americans giving him a positive rating, according to a Marist Poll released Wednesday.

Although he is still popular among Republicans, his key constituency, his job performance rating has dropped among strong Republicans from 91% in June to 79% now.

Hard to believe that 79% of Republicans still approve of President Trump!

Lets hope that American voters will come to their senses during the 2018 elections!!

Risk Tolerance Questionnaire

Take a piece of paper and write down the letter that best describes you for each question. Remember that risk tolerance is largely subjective, so there is no right or wrong answer.

Life Stage

  1. What is your current age? 
    a) 65 or older.
    b) 60 to 64.
    c) 55 to 59.
    d) 50 to 54.
    e) Under 50.
  2. When do you expect to need to withdraw cash from your investment portfolio? 
    a) In less than 1 year.
    b) Within 1 to 2 years.
    c) Within 2 to 5 years.
    d) Within 5 to 10 years.
    e)Not for at least 10 years


Financial Resources

  1. How many months of current living expenses could you cover with your present savings and liquid, short-term investments, before you would have to draw on your investment portfolio? 
    a) Less than 3 months.
    b) 3 to 6 months.
    c) 6 to 12 months.
    d) More than 12 months.
  2. Over the next few years, what do you expect will happen to your income? 
    a) It will probably decrease substantially.
    b) It will probably decrease slightly.
    c) It will probably stay the same.
    d) It will probably increase slightly.
    e) It will probably increase substantially.
  3. What percentage of your gross annual income have you been able to save in recent years? 
    a) None.
    b) 1 to 5%.
    c) 5 to 10%
    d) 10 to 15%
    e) more than 15%
  4. Over the next few years, what do you expect will happen to your rate of savings? 
    a) It will probably decrease substantially.
    b) It will probably decrease slightly.
    c) It will probably stay the same.
    d) It will probably increase slightly.
    e) It will probably increase substantially.


Emotional Risk Tolerance

  1. What are your return expectations for your portfolio? 
    a) I don’t care if my portfolio keeps pace with inflation; I just want to preserve my capital.
    b) My return should keep pace with inflation, with minimum volatility.
    c) My return should be slightly more than inflation, with only moderate volatility.
    d) My return should significantly exceed inflation, even if this could mean significant volatility.
  2. How would you characterize your personality? 
    a) I’m a pessimist. I always expect the worst.
    b) I’m anxious. No matter what you say, I’ll worry.
    c) I’m cautious but open to new ideas. Convince me.
    d) I’m objective. Show me the pros and cons and I can make a decision and live with it.
    e) I’m optimistic. Things always work out in the end.
  3. When monitoring your investments over time, what do you think you will tend to focus on? 
    a) Individual investments that are doing poorly.
    b) Individual investments that are doing very well.
    c) The recent results of my overall portfolio.
    d) The long term performance of my overall portfolio.
  4. Suppose you had $10,000 to invest and the choice of 5 different portfolios with a range of possible outcomes after a single year. Which of the following portfolios would you feel most comfortable investing in? 
    a) Portfolio A, which could have a balance ranging from $9,900 to $10,300 at the end of the year.
    b) Portfolio B, which could have a balance ranging from $9,800 to $10,600 at the end of the year.
    c) Portfolio C, which could have a balance ranging from $9,600 to $11,000 at the end of the year.
    d) Portfolio D, which could have a balance ranging from $9,200 to $12,200 at the end of the year.
    e) Portfolio E, which could have a balance ranging from $8,400 to $14,000 at the end of the year.
  5. If the value of your investment portfolio dropped by 20% in one year, what would you do? 
    a) Fire my investment advisor.
    b) Move my money to more conservative investments immediately to reduce the potential for future losses.
    c) Monitor the situation, and if it looks like things could continue to deteriorate, move some of my money to more conservative investments.
    d) Consult with my investment advisor to ensure that my asset allocation is correct, and then ride it out.
    e) Consider investing more because prices are so low.
  6. Which of the following risks or events do you fear most? 
    a) A loss of principal over any period of 1 year or less.
    b) A rate of inflation that exceeds my rate of return over the long term, because it will erode the purchasing power of my money.
    c) Portfolio performance that is insufficient to meet my goals.
    d) Portfolio performance that is consistently less than industry benchmarks.
    e) A missed investment opportunity that could have yielded higher returns over the long term, even though it entailed higher risk.

Scoring

Give the following points for each answer: a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, e = 5

Interpretation of Results

If your Life Stage Score is: If your Life Stage Score is: Then your Investment Time Horizon is:
1 to 3 Short-term (5 years or less)
4 to 6 Intermediate-term (5 to 10 years)
7 to 10 Long-term (over 10 years)
If your Investment Style Score is: Then Your Investment Style is:
5 to 10 Very conservative
11 to 20 Moderately conservative
21 to 30 Moderate
31 to 40 Moderately Aggressive
41 to 50 Very aggressive

 

The Amazon effect could still benefit the following companies

The “Amazon effect” is the ongoing evolution and disruption of the retail market, resulting in increased e-commerce. The major manifestation of the Amazon effect is the ongoing consumer shift to shopping online.

You don’t have to be a financial analyst to realize that card credit usage has gone up. Most brick and mortar retail establishments allow the consumer the choice of paying with cash, debit or credit card. Almost 90 % of all purchases that happen on line are with credit cards. Credit card companies are a popular choice because they will reverse any fraudulent purchases plus some offer extended warranties and all of them have reward programs.

The three most popular credit card cards world-wide are Visa (V), MasterCard (MC) and American Express (AXP). The chart below compares all three to Amazon over a five year period. It appears that investors think that Visa will benefit the most from the “Amazon effect”.

Keep in mind that Amazon has a rewards Visa card which earns users a rebate on all their purchases. Cardholders get 3% back for purchases made at Amazon.com, 2% cash back at gas stations, restaurants and drugstores, and 1% back on all other purchases which earns users a rebate on all their purchases.

Despite news that Amazon is buying trucks and planes to better service their prime customers, delivery companies FedEx and UPS will still benefit from the “Amazon Effect.” The chart below compares these two companies to Amazon over a five year period. FedEx is by far the clear winner for investors.

While there is a glut of malls in America, there aren’t nearly enough warehouses across the U.S. to support internet retailers like Amazon. Retail sales are not in decline, but rather shifting toward e-commerce so all retailers will require large amounts of warehouse space.”

When retailers reconfigure their supply chain to accommodate the shift in consumer behavior, the requirement for warehousing space will increase substantially. This is true incremental demand and not a displacement of existing demand for warehouse square footage. Companies like Wal-Mart, Alibaba and Wayfair will also have to invest in new warehouses to try to compete with Amazon over the next few years.

Industrial REITs such as Rexford Industrial (REXR), Terreno (TRNO) and Stag Industrial (STAG) are at the top of most buy lists. Other industrial REITs that you should consider include First Industrial (FR) and Monmouth (MNR). 

Amazon’s deal for Whole Foods will likely spur a “last mile” investment by the internet giant and its competitors, Jefferies’ Petersen has predicted. “Last mile” is a reference to the warehouse that is closest to a store, a crucial point of the distribution chain that makes same-day delivery possible.

“By analyzing all of Amazon’s ‘last mile’ facilities by size and population demographics against the Industrial REIT portfolios, we found that REXR and TRNO are best positioned to serve the ‘last mile,'” Petersen said.

Then, Amazon investing in so-called secondary and tertiary markets will benefit a REIT like STAG, he added.

One of the biggest risks in owning REITs is rising interest rates. Higher borrowing costs can reduce cash flow and effect their ability to pay dividends. It also makes the financing of new projects less profitable.

A lot of the “Amazon effect” is already priced in to all of these stocks but the long term upward trend is still there.